NAACP Culpeper #7058

Also Serving Madison and Rappahannock Counties

Category: Events (Page 1 of 2)

Do you know the story behind Black Lives Matter?

The Black Lives Matter movement is a force. It’s been unapologetic about who it represents and has been doing the work to point out the many racial injustices that African Americans face in the land of the (kinda) free. Eight years have passed since George Zimmerman was acquitted in the killing of Trayvon Martin in Florida. Since then, Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Philando Castile, Ahmaud Arbury, Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, and a litany of other Black Americans have fallen to racial violence. The BLM movement, which started as a hashtag in 2013, sheds light on all those killings. It forces America to sit in its savagery.

The co-founder of the Black Lives Matter movement, Alicia Garza, will be in conversation with Zora editor-in-chief Vanessa De Luca. March is Women’s History Month, but this coming together of two Black titans would be special anytime, anywhere. Find out what it took to organize the most important civil rights movement of the 21st century. And listen to what it truly means to go past a hashtag on social media.

These conversations are needed. Perhaps now more than ever. Join Vanessa and Alicia for this live Zoom conversation titled “The Purpose of Power”. The event begins today at 4:15 ET/1:15 PT. Please register here https://medium.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_PbGFzdrwRviebNfgegCtUw

Unmasked: A COVID-19 Virtual Town Hall

 

In the next episode of the series on Thursday, February 25 at 8 PM ET / 5 PM PT, we will provide an update on the spread of COVID-19 and the latest research on vaccines, therapies, and options.

 

 

Moderated by ABC News Senior National Affairs Correspondent, Deborah Roberts, we will speak with champions at the forefront of stabilizing the crisis and ensuring a healthy recovery including:

  • Derrick Johnson, President & CEO, NAACP
  • Dr. Chris Pernell, Public Health Physician
  • Dr. Reed Tuckson, Founding Member and CEO, Black Coalition Against COVID-19
  • Dr. Cameron Webb, Senior Policy Advisor for Equity, White House COVID-19 Response Team

 

 

Special Election in Culpeper on March 30

In-person early voting starts Feb 12 at the office of the Registrar 151, N Main St., Suite 301, Culpeper VA. Election day is March 30th. Absentee by mail ballots can be requested by calling the Registrar 540-825-0652. Business hours are 8:30 a to 4:30 p weekdays. Closed on President’s Day Feb 15.

COMMENTARY: Culpeper clerk of court tasked with many responsibilities

Culpeper County will hold a special election on March 30. As of this writing, at least two individuals have announced their candidacy for the position. Since a large percentage of the county’s eligible voters are expected to take part, I share what I have learned about the importance of the position and summarize the duties of the office.

NAACP Culpeper 2021 Freedom Fund Donors

Donate to our Freedom Fund fundraiser by November 30 and you will be eligible for our prize drawings! Thanks to the generous contributions of members, friends, and local businesses, we have several wonderful items for our drawings, including a handmade afghan by member Marsha Boyd and gift certificates to local restaurants, salons, and businesses! With your tax-deductible donation, you will automatically be eligible for the drawing! All donations can be mailed to Culpeper NAACP, P.O. Box 687, Culpeper, VA 22701 or call Rosie Herrity at 540-219-8909 or Sandra Reaves-Yates at 240-461-1612 for pick-up.

2021 Freedom Fund Donors:

Marsha & Harold Boyd

Susan and Peter Bramley

Chrysler of Culpeper
11030 James Monroe Highway
Culpeper, VA 22701

Culpeper County Board of Supervisors
302 N. Main Street
Culpeper, VA 22701

Culpeper County Democratic Committee (CCDC)

Culpeper County Human Services
P.O. Box 1355
Culpeper, VA 22701

John J. “Butch” Davies & Marty Moon

Pam Davis

Fauquier Health
500 Hospital Drive
Warrenton, VA 20186

Grass Rootes Restaurant
195 E. Davis Street
Culpeper, VA 22701

Full Services LLC
Donald Haight
P.O. Box 776
Culpeper, VA 22701

Rosie & Michael Herrity

Michele & Charles Jameson

Heidi & John Lesinski

It’s About Thyme/Thyme Market
Thyme Inn/The Copper Fish
128 E. Davis Street
Culpeper, VA 22701
540.825.4264

Mane Street Hair Salon
Corrie Quinn Gyory, Owner
102 N. Main Street
Culpeper, VA 22701

Joan McBride, Realtor
Long & Foster – Culpeper Sales
15169 Montanus Dr.
Culpeper, VA 22701
(804) 450-2778
joan.mcbride@longandfoster.com
JoanMcBride.LongandFoster.com

Tracy Neely

Nicholas, Jones & Co., PLC
301 S. West Street
Culpeper, VA 22701

Lisa Peacock

Keith D. Price, Culpeper Town Council Member, & Felecia Chavez

Quail-at-the-Woods Antiques
Sara Hayes
205 N. Main Street
Culpeper, VA 22701

The Rev. Sanford Reaves, Jr.
Board Member, Rappahannock Electric Cooperative

Nan Roberts & Friends

David E. Reuther

Michelle A. Stinger

Cynthia Taylor

N Style Fashion Gallery
Sandra Reaves-Yates, Owner
102 North Main Street
Culpeper, VA 22727

Marilyn & Ed Dunphy

Carolyn Walker

Paul Walther

Elizabeth Mahan Berry

Frank Grant & Vincent Burke

The Deliberate Suppression of the Black Vote

Have you ever wondered where felony disenfranchisement and other voter suppression tactics derived from or who are most affected?

On Monday, Oct. 19, the Right to Vote Coalition in partnership with the Richmond Public Library will launch an online interactive exhibit Block The Vote: The Deliberate Suppression of the Black Vote that dives into Virginia’s history of voter suppression. Learn about the systemic disenfranchisement of the Black vote from Reconstruction to today. Explore modules on voter suppression tools, a timeline of voter disenfranchisement, and hear the voices of the disenfranchised, plus more. To explore the virtual exhibit visit: rvalibrary.org/block-the-vote.

-Block the Vote – Richmond Public Library

Block the Vote The Right to Vote coalition and the Richmond Public Library welcome you to Block The Vote: The Deliberate Suppression of the Black Vote. This exhibit traces the history of voter suppression and felony disenfranchisement in Virginia and throughout our nation.

Then continue your journey by joining us at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020, for virtual screening of “Suppressed 2020: The Fight to Vote.” Suppressed documents how voter suppression tactics were used in the 2018 midterm election in Georgia to successfully prevent hundreds of thousands of voters from casting their ballot. The film uncovers the insidious voter suppression tactics that politicians across the country use to stay in power – poll closures, voter purges, understaffed poll locations, and more to block the votes of African American and poor communities. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion about Voting in Virginia – from the positive impact of recent legislation to our confusing election season (itself a suppression tactic) to the continued fight to end felony disenfranchisement.

Suppressed: The Fight to Vote

Join us for a virtual film screening of Suppressed: The Fight to Vote followed by a panel discussion and audience Q&A. Registration is required. This program is in partnership with the Right to Vote Coaliti…

A free and accessible voting system is as important today than ever before. Today one in five Virginians cannot vote because of felony disenfranchisement. That’s nearly 300,000 Virginians who will not have a voice in who governs them but are expected to pay taxes. Visit Block the Vote: The Deliberate Suppression of the Black Vote and join us for the screening of Suppressed to see how you can take action to ensure every Virginia citizen over the age of 18 the right to vote.

Race, Media, and the 2020 Election

Speaker Series panel at the Robertson School: Samantha Willis (top left), Kym Grinnage (top right), Elliott Robinson (bottom left), Calvin Anthony Duncan (bottom middle), and Danita Rountree Green (bottom right).

Elliott Robinson, the news editor at Charlottesville Tomorrow and a member of the board of SPJ Virginia Pro, will be on a panel discussion at 5 p.m. Tuesday (Oct. 6) on “Race, Media, and the 2020 Election.”

The free online event is part of the virtual Speaker Series sponsored by the Robertson School of Media and Culture at Virginia Commonwealth University. The other panelists are:

  • Kym Grinnage, vice president and general manager, NBC 12
  • Danita Rountree Green, author, and Co-CEO of Coming To The Table-RVA
  • Calvin Anthony Duncan, pastor and founder, Faith and Family Church
  • Samantha Willis, independent journalist, and writer

Moderating the panel discussion will be Dr. Aloni Hill, assistant professor of journalism in the Robertson School, and Robb Crocker, podcaster, digital journalist, and doctoral student in VCU’s Media, Art, and Text program. The event is co-sponsored by the new VCU student chapter of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ).

You can watch this Speaker Series event as a Zoom webinar on the Robertson School’s website — https://robertson.vcu.edu/news/speaker-series-panel-debates-race-media-and-the-2020-election.html — or as a live stream on the school’s Facebook page — https://www.facebook.com/TheRobertsonSchool — at the time of the event.

At 6 p.m. on the following Tuesday (Oct. 13), SPJ Virginia Pro has organized an online event featuring Dorothy Butler Gilliam, the first Black woman reporter at The Washington Post and author of a recent memoir. Details on that event are at:

https://spjva.com/2020/09/25/oct-13-a-conversation-with-trailblazing-journalist-dorothy-gilliam/

https://www.facebook.com/SPJVa/posts/2764854190466114

The Oct. 13 event will be moderated by Diane Walker, an anchor at NBC 12, and a member of the Virginia Communications Hall of Fame. It is co-sponsored by the VCU Robertson School and the BND Institute of Media and Culture.

 

Jeff South | Associate Professor Emeritus | Virginia Commonwealth University
President | Virginia Pro Chapter | Society of Professional Journalists
Freelance journalist | Newsroom trainer | Fulbright scholar | jeff-south.com
804-519-1062  | JeffSouthRVA@gmail.com | LinkedIn | Facebook | Twitter

2020 Virtual March on Washington

For generations, African Americans in this country have faced an anti-Black pandemic. From the unjust killings of innocent African Americans to the disproportionate impact of a global health pandemic, Black people have been getting attacked on all fronts. This moment has exposed the inequality embedded in the underlying fabric of our nation.

Join the thousands – virtually-who will March on Washington to set forth a bold new Black agenda restore and recommit to the dream. The Commitment March, convened by Rev. Al Sharpton and Martin Luther King III, will gather at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C., for an inclusive day of action.

The 2020 Virtual March on Washington and the Commitment March will take place on the 57th anniversary of the historic March on Washington, where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech.

How to Vote in the 2020 Election

There are three different ways you can vote this year!

What’s your plan?

 

1 Vote by Mail

Click here to apply online to vote absentee by mail. The deadline to apply is Oct. 23.

 

2 Vote Early In-person

You can vote early at your local registrar’s office beginning Sept. 18 and ending Oct. 31. To check that you are registered to vote, click here. To find the location and hours for early voting in your county,  call your local registrar’s office, click here. You do not have to have a reason or fill out an application to vote early. You will need to show an acceptable form of ID or sign an ID Confirmation Statement. To view a complete list of acceptable IDs, click here. Accessible equipment and/or curbside voting is available upon request.

 

3 Vote In-Person on Election Day

The polls will be open from 6 AM until 7 PM on November 3. Find your polling location here.

 

Need more help? Call the Virginia Department of Elections (804) 864-8901

This time, the Alabama state troopers saluted

SELMA — This time, the Alabama state troopers saluted.

The late John Lewis crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge for the final time Sunday in a triumphant celebration of his tireless fight for civil rights, often in the face of violent resistance.

Mourners cheered, sang, and cried as a horse-drawn carriage carried Lewis’ flag-draped casket over the Alabama River and toward Montgomery.

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