NAACP Culpeper #7058

Also Serving Madison and Rappahannock Counties

Category: History

The COVID Contract

The Declaration of Independence states that all men are created equal; the racial contract limits this to white men with property. The law says murder is illegal; the racial contract says it’s fine for white people to chase and murder black people if they have decided that those black people scare them. “The terms of the Racial Contract,” Mills wrote, “mean that nonwhite subpersonhood is enshrined simultaneously with white personhood.”

NAACP to Host King Remembrance Service on January 20

The NAACP Culpeper Branch #7058 will host its annual service commemorating the birthday of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., on Monday, January 20, beginning at 12 noon at Antioch Baptist Church in Culpeper. The church is located at 202 S. West Street.

The Rev. Reese Washington, pastor of Shiloh Baptist Church, Brandy Station, will speak at the event. Shiloh Youth will present “We Are the Dream.”

The event will be sponsored by Marty and Butch Davies, III. The NAACP Culpeper branch serves Culpeper, Madison, and Rappahannock Counties.

Descendants of first Africans in America have ties to Red Oak Mountain


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Rappahannock County, it turns out, has historical ties to the first African child born in mainland America.

Records of the Virginia Colony draw attention to the 1624 baptism of an infant named “William” Tucker, his parents Antony and Isabella among the “20 and odd” slaves transported to Jamestown in 1619 by the English vessel White Lion.

The Africans, who were kidnapped from modern-day Angola and later captured from a Portuguese slave ship, were traded to the Jamestown colonists in exchange for food. Their arrival in the New World was also documented by the pen of John Rolfe, the widower of Pocahontas.

A 1625 census taken by the Virginia Colony additionally lists Antony and Isabella as belonging to the household of Capt. William Tucker, among the colony’s original settlers. As was common in America in the centuries that followed, the African family took Tucker’s surname. The same census shows their son William as being recently “Baptised.”

https://www.rappnews.com/features/history/descendants-of-first-africans-in-america-have-ties-to-red/article_dde926a8-2ae9-11ea-8b9e-339c576c41ac.html

Tar Heel Confederates

Just days ago, UNC faculty voted to condemn the Board of Governors’ decision to give $2.5 million to a Confederate hate group for keeping the Silent Sam statue. The statue was removed last Spring after students and other university supporters protested it’s on-campus presence. The statue, erected in 1913 by a former UNC trustee as he whipped a Black woman for insulting it, will now be housed at the Sons of Confederate Veterans headquarters. The university’s gift of $2.5 million will fund the headquarters for a group whose mission is heavily invested in a return to slavery. With growing university support, we can demand the Board of Governors to stop funding Confederate hate.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s daughter slams Comcast over attack on civil rights law

In pursuing a legal edge against Allen’s claims of racial discrimination, Comcast’s appeal to the Supreme Court rests on changing the essence of the Civil Rights Act of 1866. It would require people to prove race was the sole motivating factor for any discrimination claims, not a partial factor as was used in the past.

“To alter the Act to accommodate discrimination against people based on race would reverse precarious progress in the freedom struggle, which my father was assassinated for leading and which my mother continued to join others in leading until her death,” Dr. King writes.

Toni Morrison Deconstructs White Supremacy in America

“Few intellectuals have waged a public battle against white supremacy and patriarchy like Toni Morrison. Morrison has both examined and challenged systems of domination throughout her intellectual life. With her novels, essays, and interviews she has taken critical looks at the interlocking systems of race and gender oppression. In this interview she is asked by PBS’s Charlie Rose what it is like for her to encounter racism. In true Morrison fashion she turns the question on its head, and places the onus for explaining racism back into the hands of White people. She asks Rose what he thinks of racism, why do Whites hold onto, and what are they going to do about it ending it. She rejects the notion that racism is simply something that Black people must grapple with, insisting, demanding, that White people also grapple with it. Fearless. Brilliant. Powerful.”

Toni Morrison (born Chloe Ardelia Wofford; February 18, 1931 – August 5, 2019) was an American novelist, essayist, editor, teacher and professor emeritus at Princeton University. Her first novel, The Bluest Eye, was published in 1970. The critically acclaimed Song of Solomon (1977) brought her national attention and won the National Book Critics Circle Award. In 1988, she won the Pulitzer Prize and the American Book Award for Beloved (1987).

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