NAACP Culpeper #7058

Also Serving Madison and Rappahannock Counties

Category: History (Page 2 of 2)

Washington, Douglass Commonwealth

Times change — or rather, times are changed. Prompted by the historic, inspiring, powerful nationwide Black Lives Matter protests following the murder of George Floyd — and Trump’s appalling use of the military to occupy Washington D.C. in response — Democratic leaders in the House moved forward on the D.C. statehood bill. Last week, for the first time in history, the House passed a bill that would make Washington, D.C. the 51st state in the union. The new state would be admitted as the state of Washington, Douglass Commonwealth — named after famed abolitionist and civil rights leader Frederick Douglass.

Why is D.C. statehood a response at all to nationwide Black Lives Matter protests? To answer that question, you’ve got to ask another: why does a geographic area in America with more residents than two states, and that pays more federal taxes than 22 states, lack any voting representation in Congress?

The answer to that question goes back long before that first D.C. state constitution draft. You could of course go all the way back to the founding of the country, but let’s jump to 1890. In that year, a southern conservative Senator gave a speech to explain why Congress chose to disenfranchise D.C. residents at the precise moment that the Black population was becoming a political force in the District. The full quote is worth a read:

“Now, the historical fact is simply this, that the negroes came into this District from Virginia and Maryland and from other places…they came in here and they took possession of a certain part of the political power of this District…and there was but one way to get out…and that was to deny the right of suffrage entirely to every human being in the District and have every office here controlled by appointment instead of by election…in order to get rid of this load of negro suffrage that was flooded in upon them. This is the true statement. History cannot be reversed. No man can misunderstand it.”

Those are the words written into the congressional record. No one can misunderstand it.

Fast forward 130 years.

After the House passed the D.C. statehood bill last week, another southern Senator took the floor of the U.S. Senate to discuss voting rights for D.C. residents. Senator Tom Cotton of Arkansas explained why Wyoming’s overwhelmingly white population of 578,000 should have two senators, while D.C.’s majority Black and brown population of 705,000 should have zero senators. Wyoming, he pointed out, “has three times as many workers in mining, logging, and construction.”

Huh? But it wasn’t just the lack of lumberjacks in D.C. that bothered Cotton. He went on to call into question the competence of two Black D.C. mayors: “Would you trust Mayor Bowser to keep Washington safe if she were given the powers of a governor? Would you trust Marion Barry?”

This isn’t subtle. Cotton’s message was loud and clear. No one should misunderstand it.

Now, Tom Cotton’s speech was mostly just bombast and bluster. He didn’t need to even give the speech, because he knows perfectly well that as long as Mitch McConnell serves as Senate Majority Leader, D.C. statehood will never even come to a vote in the Senate. Last year McConnell took to the Senate floor to describe D.C. statehood as “full-bore socialism.”

This isn’t complicated. Trump tweets videos of his supporters shouting “white power” and his supporters in the Senate block enfranchisement of hundreds of thousands of Black voters.

D.C.’s statehood may have felt like a far-away dream even a few months ago. But the Democratic House has now signaled its support. The Democratic senators have signaled their support. Joe Biden has signaled his support. If we build a Democratic trifecta this November, we could be welcoming D.C. to the Union as soon as next year. It’s the right thing to do. And it’s long — like a hundred years plus — overdue.

In solidarity,
Ezra & Leah
Co-founders & Co-Executive Directors, Indivisible

Why celebrating Juneteenth is more important now than ever

It’s time for America to truly grapple with its legacy of slavery.

“There are those in this society that still hold on to the idea that the Civil War wasn’t about slavery, it was about states’ rights or Northern aggression against slavery,” says Karlos Hill, a professor of African and African-American studies at the University of Oklahoma and the author of Beyond the Rope: The Impact of Lynching on Black Culture and Memory. “Juneteenth is a moment where we step back and try to understand the Civil War through the eyes of enslaved people.”

 

Our Response

#WeAreDoneDying

The Mission of the Culpeper branch of the NAACP is the same as it is nationally, to ensure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights of all persons and to eliminate race-based discrimination.

While we celebrate the victories of the past and continue, peacefully, to expand on those victories, we are reminded by the current events across the nation that there is much work to be done.

We must confess, we are tired of fighting the same fight, over and over.  However, we do not have the luxury of resting.  We must continue the pursuit of equality by eliminating the systemic racism that continues to be prevalent in our country.  We will not rest and pass the responsibility on yet to another generation.

Over the last few months, we have had to contend with the results of inequities in both healthcare and economics in our communities; and yet you hit us with another battle to fight.  We have had to contend with the brutality and humility perpetuated towards our community over-and-over again.  We will not be compelled to respond with knee-jerk reactions.  We are going to move forward together, methodically, with a well-planned movement.  This can only be achieved by including those of all creeds, colors, political and religious persuasions.  We will continue to work with our local leaders, including our law enforcement; to whom we have worked to build strong bridges.

We are not going to accept the spread of divisiveness promulgated by a few,  determine how we move forward.  We know our worth and the strength of our VOTE.  We have remained a non-partisan, peaceful organization, however, those who have made the decision to sit back and let our democracy continue to be crushed will be voted out in our continued pursuit of equality.  As Dr. King said, “We must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.”   “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.”

To all the Ahmaud Arberys, George Floyds, and Breonna Taylors, our promise to you is that “We will not give up the fight for equality and justice.  Yes, we are tired, we are hurt, but while standing on the shoulders of those before us, we will never give up hope.  Our Faith will remain strong, and we will never be broken as long as we have breath in our bodies.”

In Solidarity,

Sandra Reaves-Yates, President
NAACP Culpeper Branch #7058

We Are Done Dying

Leslie Redmond, President of NAACP Minneapolis, demands justice at the frontlines.

If the indefensible murder of George Floyd was not already enough, last night we watched in horror as our people were shot at, tear-gassed and beaten.

This moment calls for us to unite around the outrage we feel and fight for the justice we demand. And that’s exactly what the NAACP is doing. We will not rest until we see these officers charged and convicted for the murder of George Floyd. We will not stop until everyone from the White House to the streets of the Twin Cities knows: We are done dying.

You can join the fight now by supporting the NAACP. Your gift will be put to work immediately pursuing justice in this case and demanding change to the systemic racism that led to this tragedy and to the countless others that tear apart the Black community every day.

The murder of George Floyd by police is an unspeakable tragedy. But sadly, police brutality against the Black community is a continuous and ever-present danger. It comes out of the systemic racism and prejudice ingrained in the fabric of this nation for decades and is currently being refueled and reinvigorated by the President.

After last night’s tragedy, President Trump tweeted that “THUGS are dishonoring the memory of George Floyd” and that “when the looting starts, the shooting starts.”

That is a disgraceful and dangerous statement. The only people dishonoring the memory of George Floyd – indeed of all the black men and women whose lives are needlessly taken – are those who support the brutality perpetrated against our people.

We must hold all involved criminally accountable for the death of Mr. Floyd.  And we must do it now.

Please add your voice to this call for justice. Stand with the NAACP today.

The uprising spreading across this country from Minneapolis to Louisville and beyond is born of the hate, bigotry and racism felt by our communities every day.

What we’re seeing isn’t reactionary violence, it’s Black communities coming together and declaring once and for all that we are done dying.

Last night, in the midst of peaceful protests, rioters with their own agenda have become the national focal point. But we can’t afford to lose sight of what’s really important: justice for George Floyd and for all black men and women who have needlessly lost their lives.

I know there’s a lot of anger, sadness, frustration, and confusion out there. But I also know that if we can channel those emotions, if we can focus our pain, we can create change. I hope you will decide today to join us in our demand for justice, change, and a more equal America.

In Solidarity,

Derrick Johnson
President and CEO
NAACP

The COVID Contract

The Declaration of Independence states that all men are created equal; the racial contract limits this to white men with property. The law says murder is illegal; the racial contract says it’s fine for white people to chase and murder black people if they have decided that those black people scare them. “The terms of the Racial Contract,” Mills wrote, “mean that nonwhite subpersonhood is enshrined simultaneously with white personhood.”

NAACP to Host King Remembrance Service on January 20

The NAACP Culpeper Branch #7058 will host its annual service commemorating the birthday of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., on Monday, January 20, beginning at 12 noon at Antioch Baptist Church in Culpeper. The church is located at 202 S. West Street.

The Rev. Reese Washington, pastor of Shiloh Baptist Church, Brandy Station, will speak at the event. Shiloh Youth will present “We Are the Dream.”

The event will be sponsored by Marty and Butch Davies, III. The NAACP Culpeper branch serves Culpeper, Madison, and Rappahannock Counties.

Descendants of first Africans in America have ties to Red Oak Mountain


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Rappahannock County, it turns out, has historical ties to the first African child born in mainland America.

Records of the Virginia Colony draw attention to the 1624 baptism of an infant named “William” Tucker, his parents Antony and Isabella among the “20 and odd” slaves transported to Jamestown in 1619 by the English vessel White Lion.

The Africans, who were kidnapped from modern-day Angola and later captured from a Portuguese slave ship, were traded to the Jamestown colonists in exchange for food. Their arrival in the New World was also documented by the pen of John Rolfe, the widower of Pocahontas.

A 1625 census taken by the Virginia Colony additionally lists Antony and Isabella as belonging to the household of Capt. William Tucker, among the colony’s original settlers. As was common in America in the centuries that followed, the African family took Tucker’s surname. The same census shows their son William as being recently “Baptised.”

https://www.rappnews.com/features/history/descendants-of-first-africans-in-america-have-ties-to-red/article_dde926a8-2ae9-11ea-8b9e-339c576c41ac.html

Tar Heel Confederates

Just days ago, UNC faculty voted to condemn the Board of Governors’ decision to give $2.5 million to a Confederate hate group for keeping the Silent Sam statue. The statue was removed last Spring after students and other university supporters protested it’s on-campus presence. The statue, erected in 1913 by a former UNC trustee as he whipped a Black woman for insulting it, will now be housed at the Sons of Confederate Veterans headquarters. The university’s gift of $2.5 million will fund the headquarters for a group whose mission is heavily invested in a return to slavery. With growing university support, we can demand the Board of Governors to stop funding Confederate hate.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s daughter slams Comcast over attack on civil rights law

In pursuing a legal edge against Allen’s claims of racial discrimination, Comcast’s appeal to the Supreme Court rests on changing the essence of the Civil Rights Act of 1866. It would require people to prove race was the sole motivating factor for any discrimination claims, not a partial factor as was used in the past.

“To alter the Act to accommodate discrimination against people based on race would reverse precarious progress in the freedom struggle, which my father was assassinated for leading and which my mother continued to join others in leading until her death,” Dr. King writes.

Toni Morrison Deconstructs White Supremacy in America

“Few intellectuals have waged a public battle against white supremacy and patriarchy like Toni Morrison. Morrison has both examined and challenged systems of domination throughout her intellectual life. With her novels, essays, and interviews she has taken critical looks at the interlocking systems of race and gender oppression. In this interview she is asked by PBS’s Charlie Rose what it is like for her to encounter racism. In true Morrison fashion she turns the question on its head, and places the onus for explaining racism back into the hands of White people. She asks Rose what he thinks of racism, why do Whites hold onto, and what are they going to do about it ending it. She rejects the notion that racism is simply something that Black people must grapple with, insisting, demanding, that White people also grapple with it. Fearless. Brilliant. Powerful.”

Toni Morrison (born Chloe Ardelia Wofford; February 18, 1931 – August 5, 2019) was an American novelist, essayist, editor, teacher and professor emeritus at Princeton University. Her first novel, The Bluest Eye, was published in 1970. The critically acclaimed Song of Solomon (1977) brought her national attention and won the National Book Critics Circle Award. In 1988, she won the Pulitzer Prize and the American Book Award for Beloved (1987).

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