NAACP Culpeper #7058

Also Serving Madison and Rappahannock Counties

NAACP Culpeper Branch Elects Harris as President

CONTACT INFORMATION:

NAACP Culpeper Branch #7058
Cindy Taylor
secretary@naacpculpeper.org

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Culpeper, VA January 6 – The Culpeper Branch of the NAACP, also serving Madison and Rappahannock counties, has elected the Rev. Dr. Uzziah Anthony Harris as its president for the 2021-2022 term. Dr. Harris had previously served as vice president of the organization. He succeeds Sandra Reaves-Yates, who served as president for two terms, beginning in 2017.

A North Carolina native and resident of Culpeper, Dr. Harris is an educator, certified life coach, and ordained minister. He is currently a teacher and coach at Floyd T. Binns Middle School in Culpeper. Dr. Harris holds undergraduate degrees in psychology and education from the College of William & Mary (1999) and earned both a Master of Divinity (2012) and a Doctor of Divinity (2014) from the Virginia Triumphant College and Seminary. He was ordained by the school in 2016.

Dr. Harris has been a participant in the Virginia Commonwealth University Grace E. Harris Minority Political Leadership Institute and the Sorensen Political Leadership Institute at the University of Virginia. He is the author of three books, including Trial by Fire: Deliberation Over the Soul of a Nation.

“I’m grateful to my predecessor, Mrs. Sandra Reaves-Yates, and to all who are committed to the important work of the NAACP,” Dr. Harris stated at his installation in December. “To meet the challenges of the new year, with the ongoing racial unrest and the pandemic, it is clear that, more than 50 years after Dr. Martin Luther King’s death, we must still continue this important work. We must build bridges and create policies that enable us to move forward on racial equity in education, in employment, and throughout our communities.”

In addition to Dr. Harris, officers for the 2021-2022 term include the Rev. Frank D. Lewis, pastor of Antioch Baptist Church in Madison, who is serving as vice president; Cindy Taylor, who is serving her second term as secretary; and Harold Boyd, who is serving his second term as treasurer. Sandra Reaves-Yates and Ren LeVally were elected as at-large members of the board.

Presiding over her final meeting as president in December, Reaves-Yates presented several awards to branch members for leadership and service. NAACP Culpeper Image awards were presented to Gwendolyn Sanford, who chaired the branch’s Education Committee, and the Rev. Sanford Reaves, Jr., a former NAACP Culpeper president who chaired the Legal Redress Committee. Service awards were presented to Treasurer Harold Boyd; Rose and Mike Herrity, who helped oversee the Freedom Fund fundraising effort; and Ren LeVally, an at-large board member and chair of the Public Relations Committee. Marilyn and Ed Dunphy were presented with the Community Service award. Secretary Cindy Taylor was presented with the 2020 President’s Award.

Founded in 1909 in response to the ongoing violence against Black people around the country, the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) is the largest and most pre-eminent civil rights organization in the nation. The NAACP has more than 2,200 units and branches across the nation, along with well over two million activists. The organization’s mission is to secure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights in order to eliminate race-based discrimination and ensure the health and well-being of all persons.

The Culpeper Branch of the NAACP meets on the third Thursday evening of the month at 7 pm and is currently meeting via Zoom. The branch will host a tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., on January 18, 2021, at 1 pm. The event will be live-streamed on the NAACP Culpeper website and Facebook page. For more information on meetings, events, and membership, visit https://naacpculpeper.org.

 

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Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo Talks Ending ‘Lawful But Awful’ Policing

Meet the Police Chief who might just be one of the best leaders in the country. Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo is leading the calls for police reform from the inside — and today sits down with Carlos to discuss how police forces are more progressive than corporate America, but how still more needs to be done to root out “bushels of bad apples” and to end police tactics that may be technically lawful, but are nevertheless awful and inhumane.

To listen to the full, unedited conversation between Carlos and Art Acevedo, subscribe to the podcast version of the show here: http://podcasts.iheartradio.com/s_34Zjdh

How COVID-19 Hollowed Out a Generation of Young Black Men

While COVID-19 has killed 1 out of every 800 African Americans, a toll that overwhelms the imagination, even more stunning is the deadly efficiency with which it has targeted young Black men like Bates. One study using data through July found that Black people ages 35 to 44 were dying at nine times the rate of white people the same age, though the gap slightly narrowed later in the year. And in an analysis for ProPublica this summer using the only reliable data at the time accounting for age, race and gender, from Michigan and Georgia, Harvard researcher Tamara Rushovich found that the disparity was greatest in Black men.

They were pillars of their communities and families, and they are not replaceable. To understand why COVID-19 killed so many young Black men, you need to know the legend of John Henry.

How COVID-19 Hollowed Out a Generation of Young Black Men

The Rev. Dr. Kejuane Artez Bates was a big man with big responsibilities. The arrival of the novel coronavirus in Vidalia, Louisiana, was another burden on a body already breaking under the load. Bates was in his 10th year with the Vidalia Police Department, assigned as a resource officer to the upper elementary school.

Virginia NAACP names Da’Quan Marcell Love as Executive Director

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

MEDIA CONTACT:
press@naacpva.org

VIRGINIA NAACP NAMES DA’QUAN MARCELL LOVE
STATE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Da’Quan Marcell LoveRICHMOND (December 1, 2020) – The Virginia State Conference of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (Virginia NAACP) has selected Da’Quan Marcell Love as Executive Director, it was announced today. Love, 28, will make history, becoming the youngest state executive director in NAACP history when he takes office in January 2021.

A Henrico, Virginia native, Mr. Love is a longtime member, leader, and respected civil rights activist who will be tasked with guiding the Virginia NAACP through a period of tremendous challenge and opportunity at a key point in its 85-year history. The Virginia NAACP has undergone transitions in leadership over the past several years as it re-imagines itself to take on a tumultuous and contentious social and political climate.

“Da’Quan comes to us with a wealth of experience on the national level. He has the business acumen, strategic leadership, and knowledge of the Association to lead our State Headquarters and serve our membership in an outstanding manner,” said Robert N. Barnette, Jr., President of the Virginia NAACP. “As a civil rights veteran, he is intimately knowledgeable about the issues that Black Virginians face and that the Virginia NAACP must work to address,” he added.

National NAACP Administrator Gloria Sweet-Love commented: “Having worked with the Virginia NAACP over the past two years, I’m confident that Da’Quan is the perfect candidate to lead this state conference forward so it can implement its strategic plan.” She continued, “Mr. Love’s unique knowledge of the internal workings of the NAACP and the professional relationships he brings from the political arena will undoubtedly elevate the Virginia NAACP’s political advocacy efforts.”

Mr. Love was selected by the Executive Committee after a national search yielded over 60 highly-qualified candidates.

A former member of the NAACP National Board of Directors, Da’Quan served in many national leadership roles including vice-chair of the annual national convention, and chair of the National Youth Work Committee. As national youth work chair, he led the programmatic oversight of the NAACP’s youth and college units across the country. He formerly served as president of the Virginia State Conference NAACP Youth & College Division, where he successfully led a campaign to stop the proposed invalidation of more than 16,000 voter registration applications in 2012.

Aligned with the Virginia NAACP’s intense focus on non-partisan political and voter engagement for the 2021 election cycle, Da’Quan brings an unmatched political acumen to the state conference. A former state legislative candidate and political staffer, Da’Quan has worked on numerous local, state, and federal political campaigns as a fundraiser and strategist.

Da’Quan earned his bachelor’s in political science from historically-black Hampton University and his master’s in teaching from North Carolina State University. He serves on the board of directors of Profound Gentlemen and New Leaders Council-North Carolina and is a proud member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

Da’Quan will be the sixth full-time executive director of the Virginia NAACP, following the likes of former executive directors: Lester Banks (Executive Secretary) 1947-1977; Jack Gravely 1977-1984; W. Paul Matthews 1984-1986; Linda Byrd Harden 1987-1998; King Salim Khalfani 1998-2014.

 

ABOUT THE VIRGINIA NAACP:

Founded in 1935, the Virginia State Conference of NAACP Branches (Virginia NAACP) is the oldest and largest nonpartisan civil rights organization in the Commonwealth. The Virginia NAACP is focused on being the preeminent voice of Black Virginians and advocating for policies and programs to benefit Blacks and people of color. You can read more about the Virginia NAACP’s work and our six “Game Changer” issue areas by visiting  VSCNAACP.org.

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An Open Letter to the Members of the Culpeper School Board and Board of Supervisors

October 23, 2020

Dear County School Board and Board of Supervisors Members:

The members of the NAACP Culpeper Branch #7058 are concerned about the most recent efforts by our Board of Supervisors (BOS) and CCPS School Board to politicize the operations and funding of our public schools. Various members of the BOS seem to see the difficult decisions made by the School Board relative to the safe operation of schools during the pandemic as an opportunity to score political points by diverting county funding away from our public schools.

During the budget process last spring, the school system was asked to propose a minimal operational budget in part because the county was unsure of its ability to fund the schools and other essential services throughout the pandemic. This request was honored by the school system but the BOS shaved an additional $1.4 million from the proposal. Perhaps the motivation leading the county at the time was to consider how they would move forward if tax revenues dropped due to lower sales tax collections. However, only a few months later the county finds itself with no such sales tax deficit; in fact, revenues are ahead of last year. In spite of this, several supervisors have expressed a desire to reduce school funding not for the sake of our community, but for their own political gain.

If left unchecked, the BOS (with both the implicit and explicit consent of a majority of the CCPS School Board) would like to cripple the public school system to the point of only being able to provide the bare minimum Standards of Quality (SOQ) requirements mandated by the State. What would this type of funding and (by consequence) educational scenario mean for our children?

What is being haphazardly suggested by certain members of both the BOS and CCPS School Board flies in the face of both the professionals who have made it their life’s work to educate as well as our community members who have overwhelmingly made their choice in favor of the virtual learning model. This ill-advised course of action will cause the elimination of many popular educational programs that exceed the State’s minimum requirements. In addition, it will cause overcrowding of classes/school buildings inconsistent with CDC and VA guidelines. It may also inadvertently cause an exodus of great educators (educators who are both a part of our community and who commute to it). These valued professionals need not travel farther than a couple of counties over not only to make more money but to make that money in a safer and more supportive environment. This is not the quality of education nor the educational environment that the Culpeper NAACP wants for our students or for our community; nor is it the quality that you should afford said community and our students.

Nearly 60% of parents have opted to have their children attend virtual classes per the State and order of the Governor; it is also their right. It is the responsibility of the School Board to honor this request and the responsibility of the BOS to ensure the adequate funding of these initiatives. As a side note, it is also the responsibility of the School Board and BOS to follow all CDC and State Department of Health guidelines pertaining to COVID19 pandemic safety. We will not sit by passively as some School Board and BOS members push for a dangerous “herd immunity” strategy that is rooted in political doctrine more than science and data. In the words of William Hasseltine, President and Chair of ACCESS Health International, “Herd immunity is another word for mass murder.” Our community is highly susceptible to the virus and our economy, easily influenced by its effects on small businesses—we don’t have the time or resources, or people to waste.

In light of all of these concerns, we’d also wish to point out the lack of diversity on both the BOS and CCPS School Board. The abrupt and untimely resignation of Board Chair Michelle North leaves a vacuum in terms of steady leadership and we are asking that the process of filling the vacated seat include more of a concerted effort on the part of the BOS and CCPS School Board to reach out to an expanded pool of applicants. We wish for applicants who will provide more diverse and inclusive perspectives to augment the current board’s makeup. In order for the voices of the entire community to be heard, we must have a representative on the Board who understands both our background and ideals.

Sincerely,

Culpeper NAACP Branch #7058

NAACP Culpeper 2021 Freedom Fund Donors

Donate to our Freedom Fund fundraiser by November 30 and you will be eligible for our prize drawings! Thanks to the generous contributions of members, friends, and local businesses, we have several wonderful items for our drawings, including a handmade afghan by member Marsha Boyd and gift certificates to local restaurants, salons, and businesses! With your tax-deductible donation, you will automatically be eligible for the drawing! All donations can be mailed to Culpeper NAACP, P.O. Box 687, Culpeper, VA 22701 or call Rosie Herrity at 540-219-8909 or Sandra Reaves-Yates at 240-461-1612 for pick-up.

2021 Freedom Fund Donors:

Marsha & Harold Boyd

Susan and Peter Bramley

Chrysler of Culpeper
11030 James Monroe Highway
Culpeper, VA 22701

Culpeper County Board of Supervisors
302 N. Main Street
Culpeper, VA 22701

Culpeper County Democratic Committee (CCDC)

Culpeper County Human Services
P.O. Box 1355
Culpeper, VA 22701

John J. “Butch” Davies & Marty Moon

Pam Davis

Fauquier Health
500 Hospital Drive
Warrenton, VA 20186

Grass Rootes Restaurant
195 E. Davis Street
Culpeper, VA 22701

Full Services LLC
Donald Haight
P.O. Box 776
Culpeper, VA 22701

Rosie & Michael Herrity

Michele & Charles Jameson

Heidi & John Lesinski

It’s About Thyme/Thyme Market
Thyme Inn/The Copper Fish
128 E. Davis Street
Culpeper, VA 22701
540.825.4264

Mane Street Hair Salon
Corrie Quinn Gyory, Owner
102 N. Main Street
Culpeper, VA 22701

Joan McBride, Realtor
Long & Foster – Culpeper Sales
15169 Montanus Dr.
Culpeper, VA 22701
(804) 450-2778
joan.mcbride@longandfoster.com
JoanMcBride.LongandFoster.com

Tracy Neely

Nicholas, Jones & Co., PLC
301 S. West Street
Culpeper, VA 22701

Lisa Peacock

Keith D. Price, Culpeper Town Council Member, & Felecia Chavez

Quail-at-the-Woods Antiques
Sara Hayes
205 N. Main Street
Culpeper, VA 22701

The Rev. Sanford Reaves, Jr.
Board Member, Rappahannock Electric Cooperative

Nan Roberts & Friends

David E. Reuther

Michelle A. Stinger

Cynthia Taylor

N Style Fashion Gallery
Sandra Reaves-Yates, Owner
102 North Main Street
Culpeper, VA 22727

Marilyn & Ed Dunphy

Carolyn Walker

Paul Walther

Elizabeth Mahan Berry

Frank Grant & Vincent Burke

This Election is the Most Important in a Century

While COVID-19 has killed 225,000 people in the U.S., from all racial and socio-economic backgrounds, it has been twice as lethal for Black Americans. The resulting economic recession cost 22 million people their jobs, but disproportionately impacted people of color. And the slow economic recovery is playing out along racial lines, too: by September, only 7% of white workers were still unemployed, compared to 12% of Black ones. Meanwhile, police violence and its aftermath has an uneven impact on communities of color

NAACP President: Will This Democracy Be Recognizable?

NAACP Derrick Johnson on the stakes of this election and what his organization is doing to turn out the vote

Help Support Our Freedom Fund!

In lieu of holding our annual Freedom Fund Banquet, we are appealing to our members and friends to send a donation to support this important cause. Tickets to the event would have been $50 each; we welcome any contribution you can make to further our efforts to advance racial justice through advocacy, education, and outreach. In particular, this fund helps support our annual high school scholarships. All those who contribute by October 31 will be eligible for our raffle drawings of gifts from local merchants and businesses! Donations should be mailed to NAACP Culpeper Branch, P.O. Box 687, Culpeper, VA, 22701.

Download (PDF)

The Deliberate Suppression of the Black Vote

Have you ever wondered where felony disenfranchisement and other voter suppression tactics derived from or who are most affected?

On Monday, Oct. 19, the Right to Vote Coalition in partnership with the Richmond Public Library will launch an online interactive exhibit Block The Vote: The Deliberate Suppression of the Black Vote that dives into Virginia’s history of voter suppression. Learn about the systemic disenfranchisement of the Black vote from Reconstruction to today. Explore modules on voter suppression tools, a timeline of voter disenfranchisement, and hear the voices of the disenfranchised, plus more. To explore the virtual exhibit visit: rvalibrary.org/block-the-vote.

-Block the Vote – Richmond Public Library

Block the Vote The Right to Vote coalition and the Richmond Public Library welcome you to Block The Vote: The Deliberate Suppression of the Black Vote. This exhibit traces the history of voter suppression and felony disenfranchisement in Virginia and throughout our nation.

Then continue your journey by joining us at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020, for virtual screening of “Suppressed 2020: The Fight to Vote.” Suppressed documents how voter suppression tactics were used in the 2018 midterm election in Georgia to successfully prevent hundreds of thousands of voters from casting their ballot. The film uncovers the insidious voter suppression tactics that politicians across the country use to stay in power – poll closures, voter purges, understaffed poll locations, and more to block the votes of African American and poor communities. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion about Voting in Virginia – from the positive impact of recent legislation to our confusing election season (itself a suppression tactic) to the continued fight to end felony disenfranchisement.

Suppressed: The Fight to Vote

Join us for a virtual film screening of Suppressed: The Fight to Vote followed by a panel discussion and audience Q&A. Registration is required. This program is in partnership with the Right to Vote Coaliti…

A free and accessible voting system is as important today than ever before. Today one in five Virginians cannot vote because of felony disenfranchisement. That’s nearly 300,000 Virginians who will not have a voice in who governs them but are expected to pay taxes. Visit Block the Vote: The Deliberate Suppression of the Black Vote and join us for the screening of Suppressed to see how you can take action to ensure every Virginia citizen over the age of 18 the right to vote.

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