NAACP Culpeper #7058

Also Serving Madison and Rappahannock Counties

Washington, Douglass Commonwealth

Times change — or rather, times are changed. Prompted by the historic, inspiring, powerful nationwide Black Lives Matter protests following the murder of George Floyd — and Trump’s appalling use of the military to occupy Washington D.C. in response — Democratic leaders in the House moved forward on the D.C. statehood bill. Last week, for the first time in history, the House passed a bill that would make Washington, D.C. the 51st state in the union. The new state would be admitted as the state of Washington, Douglass Commonwealth — named after famed abolitionist and civil rights leader Frederick Douglass.

Why is D.C. statehood a response at all to nationwide Black Lives Matter protests? To answer that question, you’ve got to ask another: why does a geographic area in America with more residents than two states, and that pays more federal taxes than 22 states, lack any voting representation in Congress?

The answer to that question goes back long before that first D.C. state constitution draft. You could of course go all the way back to the founding of the country, but let’s jump to 1890. In that year, a southern conservative Senator gave a speech to explain why Congress chose to disenfranchise D.C. residents at the precise moment that the Black population was becoming a political force in the District. The full quote is worth a read:

“Now, the historical fact is simply this, that the negroes came into this District from Virginia and Maryland and from other places…they came in here and they took possession of a certain part of the political power of this District…and there was but one way to get out…and that was to deny the right of suffrage entirely to every human being in the District and have every office here controlled by appointment instead of by election…in order to get rid of this load of negro suffrage that was flooded in upon them. This is the true statement. History cannot be reversed. No man can misunderstand it.”

Those are the words written into the congressional record. No one can misunderstand it.

Fast forward 130 years.

After the House passed the D.C. statehood bill last week, another southern Senator took the floor of the U.S. Senate to discuss voting rights for D.C. residents. Senator Tom Cotton of Arkansas explained why Wyoming’s overwhelmingly white population of 578,000 should have two senators, while D.C.’s majority Black and brown population of 705,000 should have zero senators. Wyoming, he pointed out, “has three times as many workers in mining, logging, and construction.”

Huh? But it wasn’t just the lack of lumberjacks in D.C. that bothered Cotton. He went on to call into question the competence of two Black D.C. mayors: “Would you trust Mayor Bowser to keep Washington safe if she were given the powers of a governor? Would you trust Marion Barry?”

This isn’t subtle. Cotton’s message was loud and clear. No one should misunderstand it.

Now, Tom Cotton’s speech was mostly just bombast and bluster. He didn’t need to even give the speech, because he knows perfectly well that as long as Mitch McConnell serves as Senate Majority Leader, D.C. statehood will never even come to a vote in the Senate. Last year McConnell took to the Senate floor to describe D.C. statehood as “full-bore socialism.”

This isn’t complicated. Trump tweets videos of his supporters shouting “white power” and his supporters in the Senate block enfranchisement of hundreds of thousands of Black voters.

D.C.’s statehood may have felt like a far-away dream even a few months ago. But the Democratic House has now signaled its support. The Democratic senators have signaled their support. Joe Biden has signaled his support. If we build a Democratic trifecta this November, we could be welcoming D.C. to the Union as soon as next year. It’s the right thing to do. And it’s long — like a hundred years plus — overdue.

In solidarity,
Ezra & Leah
Co-founders & Co-Executive Directors, Indivisible

Red, White and Black

Volunteer today. Make history on Tuesday, November 3.

Join today. Make history on Tuesday, November 3!

An astonishing amount has happened in the weeks since the slow-motion execution of George Floyd.

In every state and around the world, people of all colors, genders, and ages have joined together to march in fury and in hope, to renounce the past and redeem the future.

Since then, the chokehold that killed George Floyd has been banned in 20 cities and counting. Confederate monuments have toppled or have (finally) removed by officials. Around the country, communities are pushing police out of schools, and considering how to slash law enforcement budgets and reinvest the funds to address the root problems that police are so ill-equipped to handle.

But too much has also stayed the same.

Since George Floyd’s murder, police have killed Black men in Georgia and California. Around the country, six Black people have been found hanging from trees, supposed suicides that chillingly resemble lynchings and have sparked demands for investigations. And as of now, no charges have been filed against the Louisville police officers who broke into Breonna Taylor’s home and shot her dead as she slept.

The hard truth is that America still has not extended the ideals of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness to the Black community. And even centuries after our very own ancestors built this country from the ground up, the consequences of chattel slavery are still painfully reflected in the system of racism that is so thoroughly embedded in our nation’s social, economic, and political systems.

The good news is that the recent protests are evidence that true freedom is within our grasp. We have a chance now to escalate the energy of this moment and move from protest to power to policy change—as long as those of us who care about civil rights and social justice keep up the fight.

So on this Fourth of July, we’re calling on everyone to not let this moment slip through our hands. Let’s all pledge to continue doing the hard, necessary work of pushing toward a better and more just future for our families and our country.

Join the Fight for Freedom!

Black Voices Change Lives!

Over the last several weeks, we’ve witnessed what the world has never seen before.

All 50 states, dozens of countries, and hundreds of thousands of people across the globe have stood up in this moment of solidarity and offered the resounding statement: Enough is enough!

And now recognizing that our very lives depend on the actions we take next, it has never been more important for us to recognize the power that we have in this moment through our VOTE.

The NAACP has launched our Early Volunteer Program website to help us mobilize voters to take action in November. This customized site will provide up to date information surrounding state primary elections, NAACP election activities, and opportunities for you to lead your community to the polls.

Our lives depend on how we advocate for ourselves today. By adding your voice and your impact, YOU can help chart the course for our future.

Thousands have already joined us, but we need your voice as well.

Help us to ensure that democracy works for us all.

Volunteer

NAACP Applauds Supreme Court Victory in NAACP v. Trump

This case was consolidated with the Department of Homeland Security v. Regents of the University of California. The Supreme Court held that the Department of Homeland Security’s decision to rescind DACA is reviewable under the Administrative Procedures Act and was arbitrary and capricious. Further, the Supreme Court determined that the administration did not follow the legally mandated procedures, nor did it weigh how ending the program would affect those who had come to rely on its protections against deportation and the ability to work legally. In a 5-4 opinion authored by Chief Justice Roberts, the Supreme Court affirmed the district court’s ruling in the case brought by the NAACP.

 

Why celebrating Juneteenth is more important now than ever

It’s time for America to truly grapple with its legacy of slavery.

“There are those in this society that still hold on to the idea that the Civil War wasn’t about slavery, it was about states’ rights or Northern aggression against slavery,” says Karlos Hill, a professor of African and African-American studies at the University of Oklahoma and the author of Beyond the Rope: The Impact of Lynching on Black Culture and Memory. “Juneteenth is a moment where we step back and try to understand the Civil War through the eyes of enslaved people.”

 

Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival

Somebody is hurting our people and it has gone on far too long and we won’t be silent anymore

JOIN THE MOVEMENT ON JUNE 20TH

The Mass Poor People’s Assembly and Moral March on Washington is a 2.5-hour program that will be broadcast on Saturday, June 20th at 10 am EST & 6 pm EST, and again on Sunday, June 21st at 6 pm EST, at June2020.org.

The Poor People’s Campaign is a movement of tens of thousands of people across the country who are organizing to end the interlocking injustices of systemic racism, poverty, militarism, and the war economy, ecological devastation, and the distorted moral narrative of religious nationalism.

WHAT

  • The Mass Poor People’s Assembly & Moral March on Washington: A Digital Justice Gathering will be the largest digital gathering of poor, dispossessed, and impacted people in history.

WHEN

  • This 2.5-hour program will be broadcast on Saturday, June 20th at 10:00 am EST and 6:00 pm EST and again on Sunday, June 21st at 6:00 pm EST.

WHERE

  • We will gather digitally from all 50 U.S. states and territories, and from across the world. Radio and TV networks will carry the stream, but the best place to participate will be at www.june2020.org

WHY

  • There are 140 million poor and low-income people in the richest country in the history of the world. This global pandemic is exposing, even more, the already existing crisis of systemic racism, poverty, ecological devastation, the war economy and militarism, and the distorted moral narrative of religious nationalism.
  • We are gathering on June 20, 2020, to demonstrate the leadership of the poor and build power to enact a Moral Agenda for the nation.
  • If the rejected millions — those without health insurance, without living wages, without clean water, without voting protections — unite, we can move the moral and political imagination of this country and revive the heart of our democracy!

WHO

  • The Mass Poor People’s Assembly & Moral March on Washington: A Digital Justice Gathering is made up of people of all backgrounds, we are Black, Brown, White, Native, and Asian; we are old and young; we are people of faith and not of faith; we are people of all sexual orientations and gender identities; we are people of all abilities; we are led by poor people and we are a broad movement made up of those from all walks of life, and we are from every corner of this nation.

HOW

  • We will gather online on June 20, 2020, from across the country and world.
  • The digital Mass Assembly and March on June 20 & 21st will be interpreted into Spanish and ASL (American Sign Language) and will be open captioned in English.
  • ASL interpretation will be visible on-screen for the Digital Mass Assembly and March on all digital & TV network platforms.
  • Use this social media toolkit to spread the word networks and social media.
  • Get connected to your state’s coordinating committee.

George Floyd’s Autopsy and the Structural Gaslighting of America

The world was gaslit by misreporting about George Floyd’s initial autopsy report. As concerned physicians, we write to deconstruct the misinformation and condemn the ways this weaponization of medical language reinforced white supremacy at the torment of Black Americans.

 

Our Response

#WeAreDoneDying

The Mission of the Culpeper branch of the NAACP is the same as it is nationally, to ensure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights of all persons and to eliminate race-based discrimination.

While we celebrate the victories of the past and continue, peacefully, to expand on those victories, we are reminded by the current events across the nation that there is much work to be done.

We must confess, we are tired of fighting the same fight, over and over.  However, we do not have the luxury of resting.  We must continue the pursuit of equality by eliminating the systemic racism that continues to be prevalent in our country.  We will not rest and pass the responsibility on yet to another generation.

Over the last few months, we have had to contend with the results of inequities in both healthcare and economics in our communities; and yet you hit us with another battle to fight.  We have had to contend with the brutality and humility perpetuated towards our community over-and-over again.  We will not be compelled to respond with knee-jerk reactions.  We are going to move forward together, methodically, with a well-planned movement.  This can only be achieved by including those of all creeds, colors, political and religious persuasions.  We will continue to work with our local leaders, including our law enforcement; to whom we have worked to build strong bridges.

We are not going to accept the spread of divisiveness promulgated by a few,  determine how we move forward.  We know our worth and the strength of our VOTE.  We have remained a non-partisan, peaceful organization, however, those who have made the decision to sit back and let our democracy continue to be crushed will be voted out in our continued pursuit of equality.  As Dr. King said, “We must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.”   “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.”

To all the Ahmaud Arberys, George Floyds, and Breonna Taylors, our promise to you is that “We will not give up the fight for equality and justice.  Yes, we are tired, we are hurt, but while standing on the shoulders of those before us, we will never give up hope.  Our Faith will remain strong, and we will never be broken as long as we have breath in our bodies.”

In Solidarity,

Sandra Reaves-Yates, President
NAACP Culpeper Branch #7058

We Are Done Dying

Leslie Redmond, President of NAACP Minneapolis, demands justice at the frontlines.

If the indefensible murder of George Floyd was not already enough, last night we watched in horror as our people were shot at, tear-gassed and beaten.

This moment calls for us to unite around the outrage we feel and fight for the justice we demand. And that’s exactly what the NAACP is doing. We will not rest until we see these officers charged and convicted for the murder of George Floyd. We will not stop until everyone from the White House to the streets of the Twin Cities knows: We are done dying.

You can join the fight now by supporting the NAACP. Your gift will be put to work immediately pursuing justice in this case and demanding change to the systemic racism that led to this tragedy and to the countless others that tear apart the Black community every day.

The murder of George Floyd by police is an unspeakable tragedy. But sadly, police brutality against the Black community is a continuous and ever-present danger. It comes out of the systemic racism and prejudice ingrained in the fabric of this nation for decades and is currently being refueled and reinvigorated by the President.

After last night’s tragedy, President Trump tweeted that “THUGS are dishonoring the memory of George Floyd” and that “when the looting starts, the shooting starts.”

That is a disgraceful and dangerous statement. The only people dishonoring the memory of George Floyd – indeed of all the black men and women whose lives are needlessly taken – are those who support the brutality perpetrated against our people.

We must hold all involved criminally accountable for the death of Mr. Floyd.  And we must do it now.

Please add your voice to this call for justice. Stand with the NAACP today.

The uprising spreading across this country from Minneapolis to Louisville and beyond is born of the hate, bigotry and racism felt by our communities every day.

What we’re seeing isn’t reactionary violence, it’s Black communities coming together and declaring once and for all that we are done dying.

Last night, in the midst of peaceful protests, rioters with their own agenda have become the national focal point. But we can’t afford to lose sight of what’s really important: justice for George Floyd and for all black men and women who have needlessly lost their lives.

I know there’s a lot of anger, sadness, frustration, and confusion out there. But I also know that if we can channel those emotions, if we can focus our pain, we can create change. I hope you will decide today to join us in our demand for justice, change, and a more equal America.

In Solidarity,

Derrick Johnson
President and CEO
NAACP

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