NAACP Culpeper #7058

Also Serving Madison and Rappahannock Counties

Tag: Systemic Racism

Declaring Systemic Racism as a Public Health Crisis in Virginia

The Virginia NAACP strongly believes that systemic racism has manifested as a determinant to public health through persistent racial disparities in criminal justice, housing, education, health care, employment, worker protections, climate, outdoor access, food access, and technology.

More than 100 studies have linked racism to negative health outcomes, including the research supporting that the cumulative experience of racism throughout one’s life can induce chronic stress and chronic health conditions that may lead to otherwise preventable deaths. Many communities of color suffer from increased exposure to environmental hazards, poor air quality, lack of access to safe and affordable opportunities for outdoor recreation, lack of mental health services, and lack of educational and career prospects.

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Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo Talks Ending ‘Lawful But Awful’ Policing

Meet the Police Chief who might just be one of the best leaders in the country. Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo is leading the calls for police reform from the inside — and today sits down with Carlos to discuss how police forces are more progressive than corporate America, but how still more needs to be done to root out “bushels of bad apples” and to end police tactics that may be technically lawful, but are nevertheless awful and inhumane.

To listen to the full, unedited conversation between Carlos and Art Acevedo, subscribe to the podcast version of the show here: http://podcasts.iheartradio.com/s_34Zjdh

The Deliberate Suppression of the Black Vote

Have you ever wondered where felony disenfranchisement and other voter suppression tactics derived from or who are most affected?

On Monday, Oct. 19, the Right to Vote Coalition in partnership with the Richmond Public Library will launch an online interactive exhibit Block The Vote: The Deliberate Suppression of the Black Vote that dives into Virginia’s history of voter suppression. Learn about the systemic disenfranchisement of the Black vote from Reconstruction to today. Explore modules on voter suppression tools, a timeline of voter disenfranchisement, and hear the voices of the disenfranchised, plus more. To explore the virtual exhibit visit: rvalibrary.org/block-the-vote.

-Block the Vote – Richmond Public Library

Block the Vote The Right to Vote coalition and the Richmond Public Library welcome you to Block The Vote: The Deliberate Suppression of the Black Vote. This exhibit traces the history of voter suppression and felony disenfranchisement in Virginia and throughout our nation.

Then continue your journey by joining us at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020, for virtual screening of “Suppressed 2020: The Fight to Vote.” Suppressed documents how voter suppression tactics were used in the 2018 midterm election in Georgia to successfully prevent hundreds of thousands of voters from casting their ballot. The film uncovers the insidious voter suppression tactics that politicians across the country use to stay in power – poll closures, voter purges, understaffed poll locations, and more to block the votes of African American and poor communities. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion about Voting in Virginia – from the positive impact of recent legislation to our confusing election season (itself a suppression tactic) to the continued fight to end felony disenfranchisement.

Suppressed: The Fight to Vote

Join us for a virtual film screening of Suppressed: The Fight to Vote followed by a panel discussion and audience Q&A. Registration is required. This program is in partnership with the Right to Vote Coaliti…

A free and accessible voting system is as important today than ever before. Today one in five Virginians cannot vote because of felony disenfranchisement. That’s nearly 300,000 Virginians who will not have a voice in who governs them but are expected to pay taxes. Visit Block the Vote: The Deliberate Suppression of the Black Vote and join us for the screening of Suppressed to see how you can take action to ensure every Virginia citizen over the age of 18 the right to vote.

How Decades of Racist Housing Policy Left Neighborhoods Sweltering

In the 1930s, federal officials redlined these neighborhoods in Richmond, Va., marking them as risky investments because residents were Black.

Today, they are some of the hottest parts of town in the summer, with few trees and an abundance of heat-trapping pavement.

White neighborhoods that weren’t redlined tend to be much cooler today — a pattern that repeats nationwide.

 

Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival

Somebody is hurting our people and it has gone on far too long and we won’t be silent anymore

JOIN THE MOVEMENT ON JUNE 20TH

The Mass Poor People’s Assembly and Moral March on Washington is a 2.5-hour program that will be broadcast on Saturday, June 20th at 10 am EST & 6 pm EST, and again on Sunday, June 21st at 6 pm EST, at June2020.org.

The Poor People’s Campaign is a movement of tens of thousands of people across the country who are organizing to end the interlocking injustices of systemic racism, poverty, militarism, and the war economy, ecological devastation, and the distorted moral narrative of religious nationalism.

WHAT

  • The Mass Poor People’s Assembly & Moral March on Washington: A Digital Justice Gathering will be the largest digital gathering of poor, dispossessed, and impacted people in history.

WHEN

  • This 2.5-hour program will be broadcast on Saturday, June 20th at 10:00 am EST and 6:00 pm EST and again on Sunday, June 21st at 6:00 pm EST.

WHERE

  • We will gather digitally from all 50 U.S. states and territories, and from across the world. Radio and TV networks will carry the stream, but the best place to participate will be at www.june2020.org

WHY

  • There are 140 million poor and low-income people in the richest country in the history of the world. This global pandemic is exposing, even more, the already existing crisis of systemic racism, poverty, ecological devastation, the war economy and militarism, and the distorted moral narrative of religious nationalism.
  • We are gathering on June 20, 2020, to demonstrate the leadership of the poor and build power to enact a Moral Agenda for the nation.
  • If the rejected millions — those without health insurance, without living wages, without clean water, without voting protections — unite, we can move the moral and political imagination of this country and revive the heart of our democracy!

WHO

  • The Mass Poor People’s Assembly & Moral March on Washington: A Digital Justice Gathering is made up of people of all backgrounds, we are Black, Brown, White, Native, and Asian; we are old and young; we are people of faith and not of faith; we are people of all sexual orientations and gender identities; we are people of all abilities; we are led by poor people and we are a broad movement made up of those from all walks of life, and we are from every corner of this nation.

HOW

  • We will gather online on June 20, 2020, from across the country and world.
  • The digital Mass Assembly and March on June 20 & 21st will be interpreted into Spanish and ASL (American Sign Language) and will be open captioned in English.
  • ASL interpretation will be visible on-screen for the Digital Mass Assembly and March on all digital & TV network platforms.
  • Use this social media toolkit to spread the word networks and social media.
  • Get connected to your state’s coordinating committee.

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